“Be the Teacher! Inspiring students to find their own voice in English” ‪on October 13‬

Dear Educator,

National Geographic Learning is pleased to invite you to a professional development workshop –

“Be the Teacher! Inspiring students to find their own voice in English” on October 13.

Three professionals in the field of teaching junior and senior high school will present, followed by a panel discussion. It will be full of useful teaching ideas and is free to attend.

Please visit the website link below for more details and registration.

https://ngljapan.com/betheteacher-hs3/

SCHEDULE

Date: October 13 (Saturday)

Time: 13:00 – 18:00

Place: Waseda University, Waseda Campus Building 8, 3F – Conference room 303/304/305

SPEAKERS

Tomoyuki Shibahara (Kanda University of International Studies) – (Presentation in Japanese)

Takao Yamamoto (Tokyo Metropolitan Musashi Junior High School) – (Presentation in Japanese)

Joseph Shaules (Juntendo University) – (Presentation in English)

Click here to download the event flyer for more information.

Please note that seats are limited – register in advance via the link below to avoid disappointment.

CLICK HERE FOR FREE REGISTRATION NOW!

We look forward to seeing you there!

National Geographic Learning | Cengage Learning K.K.

National Geographic Learning | Cengage Learning K.K.

No 2 Funato Bldg. 5F, 1-11-11 Kudankita, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0073

TEL: 03 3511 4392 | www.cengage.jp/elt | elt@cengagejapan.com

2018 ELT e-Catalog

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LEARNING

Bringing the world to the classroom and the classroom to life

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On the Bredesen Protocol for Curing or Preventing Alzheimer’s & Dementia

That’s a question that I get… a lot. I thought it would be most expeditious if I answered here so that many people could see it and others would hopefully chime in with their thoughts. The answer lies within you; your knowledge of your current health status, your willingness to dive in and learn, and finally your comfort level with taking charge of your own health.

dementia-prevention-strategies

By Julie G.

I’ve been practicing a home brew version of the Bredesen protocol before it was “a thing.” I’m guessing that I represent many of us old-timers. When we began our E4 journeys, Dr. Bredesen’s seminal paper hadn’t even been published. We began adopting a multifactorial approach because it made sense based upon the evidence available. Many of us, like me, are doing so without the luxury of Bredesen-trained practitioners. No such helpers existed when we began our health-optimization journeys. Many of the basic tests recommended by Dr. Bredesen in The End of Alzheimer’s can easily be ordered by yourself and/or a helpful local physician. Some of the more advanced tests (if your journey takes you that direction) may require a practitioner that is more highly trained and open to Dr. Bredesen’s approach.

We created this non-profit, in part, to support and educate other E4 carriers to share what we’ve learned and to continue learning together. We’ve more recently launched a Practitioner Review Forum to share practitioners that we’ve found helpful on our journeys. You’ll notice many are not Bredesen trained.

Read More

There are Bredesen Protocol practitioners in Japan but they are very expensive.

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ESL Books

ESL Books – Textbooks for Teaching Adults: Some of the EFL Press Books

Some of the best books I have used for teaching English to junior high to adults, are by EFL Press.

“Talk a Lot: Starter Book,” and “Talk a Lot 1,” and Level 2 all have great activities for getting beginners and false beginners speaking English.

Talk a Lot 2 is more suitable for elementary or pre-intermediate level adults. Sometimes a more structured approach to teaching your classes is the order of the day. For this I recommend a series by Macmillan.

ESL Books: Textbooks for Teaching Children: The Finding Out Series & The English Land Series

Two of the best ESL book resources we have found for teaching children have been the textbook series “Finding Out,” by David Paul, the owner of David English House, and “English Land,” by Mari Nakamura and M.H. Newton (Longman Asia ELT).

Both textbook series have been extensively tested in Japan and the writers obviously understand Japanese students well.

Mari Nakamura gives teacher training sessions all over Japan. She is active, writing educational articles, training teachers, and educating young learners. She runs her own school called English Square in Kanazawa City. Further, she is the coordinator of ETJ Ishikawa Group and studies with Aston University. She has done extensive study on TEYL–Teaching English to Young Learners.

“English Land” engages students in a very colourful way, and incorporates Disney characters throughout their books. By using characters that Japanese students know and love, these books motivate children to learn English. Indeed, these books make English more real and fun for the kids.

The Finding Out Series by David Paul

Finding Out 1 is THE book hands down that I recommend for teaching children how to read. Once they master Finding Out 1, they can read many, many easy books from other textbooks to easy story books for children.

David Paul and others have put in a lot of work into the series. There are even official and unofficial resources on the internet that you can use. David Lisgo is one who has made supplementary materials for the series.

“Finding Out 1” is the book our students aged 6-11 usually start English classes with at Kevin`s English Schools. By the end of Finding Out 1 they can usually read. David Paul has done an excellent job of creating a textbook series that gets into the mind of the child, and teaches them phonics in an entertaining way.

After mastering the phonics of Finding Out 1 our students either go onto “Finding Out 2” the next textbook in the series, or onto “English Land 1” or 2.

Both series come with cards. Finding Out has very colourful small cards, while English Land`s are large, like small posters. I recommend getting both card series and both textbook series if you will teach children in Japan.

As for supplementary materials there is software for Finding Out. As alluded to, you can also find cards and materials developed by third party (teachers) that use the series. Some are free and others are not.
David Paul does his best to support the series with lectures and training sessions throughout Japan.

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ESL English Lesson Plan

ESL English Lesson Plan – developing fluency across the four skills of English.

If you ever get the chance to listen to Paul Nation, do so! He is one of the great ones! A great teacher! Teaches you while keeping you entertained and therefore focused. I attended an ETJ conference in Tokyo where I heard Nation speak. (ETJ is the association of English Teachers in Japan, and is worth joining, plus it is amazingly cheap.)

Nation points out that research shows that time on task = increased skill.

If you want to increase student fluency the activities must be easy.

He states: Reading a lot of easy material leads to fluency.

Fluency Activities Comprise

1. Message Focus

2. Easy

3. Pressure

4. Quantity

ESL English Lesson Plan – The 4/3/2 Activity

One activity Nation uses is called 4/3/2:

-in this activity students talk on the same topic each time, for 4 minutes, then with a new partner for 3 minutes, then with another partner for 2 minutes.

The key is changing partners each time, and talking on the same topic each time for a reduced amount of time.

After one student has done 4/3/2 and thus spoken for 9 minutes,the other half of the class does the same and speaks for 9 minutes.

It really is a great activity that leads to less teacher talk and more student talk!

How do you define “easy,” for students?

This depends on the choice of topic or preparation for the topic.ie) if you choose a more difficult topic that can be okay as long as you allow the students time to prepare for it.

Increasing Reading Fluency

Speed Reading

What does this activity comprise?

– Comprehension questions

– easy material

– a graph charting student progress

– 20 sessions

One thing to avoid:

Watch students while they read, and if they mouth the words, their speed will be far slower. If students are willing you can even have them bite on a pencil, and if the pencil falls they are mouthing the words. Paul Nation showed us this technique. (Or maybe he was hungry?)

What do do?

Students read an easy passage. Give the students five minutes to read the passage, marking off the time gone on the board–thus keeping time pressure on.

When they finish reading they turn over the page and answer the comprehension questions.

The students shouldn`t be able to answer more than 8 questions of the easy comprehension questions. If they are, they are reading too slowly.

Students should be able to answer 7-8 comprehension questions and no more.

Also convert their time into words per minute based on how many words of the text they read.

If students are able to answer 7/8 comprehension questions,this usually equates with faster reading speed or fluency.

The comprehension questions should be related to general ideas of the text.

Paul Nation on Reading Faster

To TEFL Activities

To Classroom Management

To Online English Grammar Lessons

Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire

The Tribes of Midnight

A Japanese Apartment

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The MAT Method

The MAT Method

ESL Methodologies, Introducing the MAT Method

The MAT Method stands for: Model, Action, Talk. It is said tobe easy to learn and easy to teach.

I think MAT is suitable for large classes and some of the activities will be suitable for small classes provided the activities are well chosen and geared well towards your particular students.

MAT is supposed to aid in keeping students focused on the lesson and involved. It keeps the class active and fun. Ritsuko Nakata a MAT trainer and English teacher feels “…if you are having fun the students will too.”

Some of the goals of MAT include:

-The students talk 80% of the time

-Leads students to talking by themselves

-MAT can be used in any class size

(however personally I feel it is best suited to large classes.)

*Some students at English schools of a certain age may rebel against the MAT method, feeling it is “not cool,” to act out the gestures MAT asks of you.

6 Second Drill Games

One of the highlights of MAT are the 6 second drill games, which can be a lot of fun!

MAT`s 3 Steps

1. Vocabulary Teach it by having students repeat many times.

2. Sentence Use this vocabulary in a sentence.

3. Question Have half the class ask a question and the other half answer. Then change.

Ritsuko Nakata had pre-made cards for her MAT sentences about the weather:

How `s the weather today?

Say it three times!

It was sunny on Saturday.

She used gestures for each question pointing outside while asking, “how`s the weather today?”

And for each answer there is a different gesture. ie) for: “It`s cloudy.” You make a gesture indicating the outline of a cloud etc.

It is an interesting method. I think it is ideal for pre-school and young elementary school children aged 6-8 as long as they are interested in it.

I could see some children rebelling against this method.

But I do want to give it a try!

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ESL Dialogues

ESL Dialogues

ESL Dialogues – A Couple of Opinions on our Profession
I think in a way it is a shame that in the EFL/ESL teaching profession we do not have more respect for the experience of teachers.

Our impressions do matter. Just because they are not a scientific study is beside the point. A teacher with many years of experience, does have something to teach us, and does have valuable knowledge to share.

by Kevin Burns

I really despise the style of academic writing where we are forced to quote Nunan, Richards, McDonough et al to back up what we know to be true from our own experience, – in order to be published in peer reviewed journals.

I suppose you can simply label me as a rebel who just does not want to play that game. But do me the courtesy of hearing me out.

Teaching English is not a science though I do agree that it can be studied scientifically to some extent. I am not saying that the studies done by the above people and others are not valuable. They are.

What I am saying is that the experience of veteran teachers too is of great value, and should be widely disseminated. We don`t have to try to emulate science to gain more respect.

Why not publish someone who has gained their opinion over a particular aspect of teaching – from observing it over twenty years?

We are professionals and we have self-respect. I don`t need the respect of naive people who do not understand fully what it takes to be an English as a second language/foreign language teacher. We do not need to impress the chemists of the world.

We just need to teach as well as we can, and help new teachers to be the best that they can be. That`s it!

The all-star, veteran teachers of each institution have a wide knowledge to share, and they should be encouraged to share it with new teachers in every way possible.

While this knowledge cannot be published as fact, and is not based upon a scientific study, it should be published and shared; as it is a wealth of information, a wealth of WISDOM I will argue.

Of course, keep up the scientific studies on relative topics in ESL/EFL. But let`s not try to emulate chemistry, or physics. We don`t need to and some of the terminology that is coming out is frankly embarrassing.

ESL Dialogues – What is with the Jargon we are now forced to use in our profession?

Whose bright idea was it to start using that?

Are we trying to be scientists now? Who are we trying to impress?

EXTENSIVE READING – what the heck is that? Oh you mean have the students read a lot. Okay now I get it.

Do we have to come up with all of this pedantic, self-indulgent terminology for some of the things we do? Why?

Why not just say it simply:

“I think it is important that students read many books.”

There, well said and you understand me right?

Do we really need terminology like:

EXTENSIVE READING ?

Teaching English is a social act not a scientific one. It is closer to psychology than it is to chemistry. And frankly “scientific studies,” of less than 100 subjects are not very convincing.

In Conclusion:

If you are not proud of what you do, then I feel sorry for you. Being an EFL/ESL teacher is a very valuable thing to do. You do not have to justify it to anyone. Be proud!

Those who can,….TEACH!

Kevin`s English Schools, the Canadian Schools in Japan!

To EFL Teaching Japan

To Teaching Spoken English

To TEFL Scams

To ESL Japan

To Board Game Rules Project

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Lesson Plan ESL

Lesson Plan ESL

The “Dumbo Feather” and Communication Circles

Lesson Plan ESL – The “Dumbo Feather” and Communication Circles
We are lucky to have another article by Thomas Anderson on teaching English in Japan to low level beginners or false beginners. If you choose to teach in Japan over other countries, you may find that Japanese learners need a fair bit of “scaffolding,” or structure to their lessons – especially elementary level adults or (beginner adults – false beginners).

In the Dumbo Feather, Anderson outlines how to accomplish this with one of his many, interesting lesson plans.

by Thomas C. Anderson

Hopefully teachers remember the Disney Film “Dumbo” about the baby elephant with very large ears that could fly and became a hero. When Dumbo began to fly, his friend the mouse gave him a red feather with the idea that he could fly if he held it. In a dramatic rescue bid Dumbo loses the feather but finds out that he doesn`t need it. With lower level students I give them a “red feather” conversation frame (see example) thendo this procedure:

1. I hand out the frame print and go over any new vocabulary, do a bit of work on pronunciation, stress, intonation, body language etc.

2. Students fill in blanks with their own information, for example: I`m from Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

3. Students are divided into two groups which stand facing each other.

4. One side is chosen to begin the conversation using the “start drama” mentioned or just “Good morning” or “Hi!”

5. Students talk to each other using the “look (at the paper)look (at your partner), speak.

6. One line moves one space to the right or left and do steps 1-5 with a new partner.

7. Eventually students do the conversation with no paper.

My role at this time is to monitor, noting any body language or other problems, making sure students aren`t reading from the paper or chatting in Japanese.

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ESL Practice

ESL Practice – Communication Circles

ESL Practice – Thomas C. Anderson, has been an English teacher in Japan for many years now. He teaches at a couple of Japan`s prestigious universities, and lives on one of her more beautiful peninsulas.
ESL Lesson Plans — ESL Communication Circles

When you teach in Japan, you need a well honed ESL lesson plans for each class. Each class is different, but Thomas C. Anderson discusses a great activity, that works for most if not all English classes in Japan.

Go to Page 1 of this article

by Thomas C. Anderson

ESL Lesson Plans — What do students talk about with their partners?

Anything and everything! I have had students talk about such varied topics as sumo, tamagochi, cell phones, friends, dating, and even their Oral English instructor! Students can be given topics by the teacher or can be put into small groups who are told to brainstorm and choose a topic. They then write it on the blackboard and three topics are chosen by the class from the list. Towards the end of the term I sometimes give the students a free topic (meaning they can talk about whatever they want).

When possible, I try to relate topics to textbook themes, vocabulary, and grammatical structures. For example, if we are studying travel, I might use “dream vacation,” “favorite trip,” and “foreign travel” as topics. With lower level students it often is helpful to write sentence frames (for example, “Where did you—-?”) and possible vocabulary on the blackboard. Students sometimes ask for the English translation of Japanese words or expressions and these can also be written on the blackboard and mentioned to the class between conversations.

ESL Practice — Monitoring Students

As I monitor students, I listen for common mistakes (such as “go to shopping,” “What do you life food?”, or “play snowboard”)which I mention to the class between conversations. This information can also be used in planning review lessons.

ESL Practice — Testing

I give my Oral English students one speaking test per quarter (two for a one semester course or four for a full-year course).Students are assigned a partner and a five minute time block well in advance of the test period. Ten possible topics for the test are chosen from the topics used in the communication circles. Students write down these topics. I usually tell the students two or three topics per period. One of two conversation cirlce times are used as review. Rather than give new topics, students talk with their partners about some or all of the test topics. In addition, I emphasize more than once that there are two ways in which they can prepare for the test. One is to make a list of possible vocabulary and question/answer forms for each topic. A second, and more important way, is for the student pairs to meet together several times outside of class to have conversations in English about topics (ie. the best way to study for a communication test is to communicate!)

ESL Lesson Plans — Japanese Usage in Class

The question now arises: “What do you do if they speak Japanese?” In the first class period (and from time to time afterwards) I talk to the students about how it is not possible to think and communicate well in English if they are using Japanese. In addition, I stress how using Japanese is selfish because it is a distraction to others and prevents them from thinking in English. As I monitor the students as they communicate, I try to keep my reprimands light-hearted. I might say something like “Some people here are speaking Swahili when they`re supposed to be speaking English!” or “Your Japaneseis very good–like a native speaker–but…” A very effective way to deal with studentpair chatting in Japanese is to stand behind one of the partners and not say anything while waiting. Sooner or later (usually sooner) these students and others get the message. I also remind the students regularly of the purpose of the activity and the fact that it is test practice.

Communication circles/lines, therefore, are not just a “teacher down time.” The teacher is kept busy as a cunsultant, monitor, diagnostician, information source/translator, and even participant.

Are conversation circles/lines worth it?–editor

You be the judge!

Here`s another example of this type of activity: The Dumbo Feather and Communication Circles.

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ESL Japan 3

ESL Lesson Plans – More on ESL Communication Circles

When you teach in Japan, you need well honed ESL lesson plans for each class. Each class is different, but Thomas C. Anderson discusses a great activity, that works for most if not all English classes in Japan.

by Thomas C. Anderson

What do students talk about with their partners?

Anything and everything! I have had students talk about such varied topics as sumo, tamagochi, cell phones, friends, dating, and even their Oral English instructor! Students can be given topics by the teacher or can be put into small groups who are told to brainstorm and choose a topic. They then write it on the blackboard and three topics are chosen by the class from the list. Towards the end of the term I sometimes give the students a free topic (meaning they can talk about whatever they want.

ESL Practice

ESL Practice – Thomas C. Anderson, has been an English teacher in Japan for many years now. He teaches at a couple of Japan`s prestigious universities, and lives on one of her more beautiful peninsulas.
ESL Lesson Plans — ESL Communication Circles

When you teach in Japan, you need a well honed ESL lesson plans for each class. Each class is different, but Thomas C. Anderson discusses a great activity, that works for most if not all English classes in Japan.

See the first page of this article

by Thomas C. Anderson

ESL Lesson Plans — What do students talk about with their partners?

Anything and everything! I have had students talk about such varied topics as sumo, tamagochi, cell phones, friends, dating, and even their Oral English instructor! Students can be given topics by the teacher or can be put into small groups who are told to brainstorm and choose a topic. They then write it on the blackboard and three topics are chosen by the class from the list. Towards the end of the term I sometimes give the students a free topic (meaning they can talk about whatever they want).

When possible, I try to relate topics to textbook themes, vocabulary, and grammatical structures. For example, if we are studying travel, I might use “dream vacation,” “favorite trip,” and “foreign travel” as topics. With lower level students it often is helpful to write sentence frames (for example, “Where did you—-?”) and possible vocabulary on the blackboard. Students sometimes ask for the English translation of Japanese words or expressions and these can also be written on the blackboard and mentioned to the class between conversations.

ESL Practice — Monitoring Students

As I monitor students, I listen for common mistakes (such as “go to shopping,” “What do you life food?”, or “play snowboard”)which I mention to the class between conversations. This information can also be used in planning review lessons.

ESL Practice — Testing

I give my Oral English students one speaking test per quarter (two for a one semester course or four for a full-year course).Students are assigned a partner and a five minute time block well in advance of the test period. Ten possible topics for the test are chosen from the topics used in the communication circles. Students write down these topics. I usually tell the students two or three topics per period. One of two conversation cirlce times are used as review. Rather than give new topics, students talk with their partners about some or all of the test topics. In addition, I emphasize more than once that there are two ways in which they can prepare for the test. One is to make a list of possible vocabulary and question/answer forms for each topic. A second, and more important way, is for the student pairs to meet together several times outside of class to have conversations in English about topics (ie. the best way to study for a communication test is to communicate!)

ESL Lesson Plans — Japanese Usage in Class

The question now arises: “What do you do if they speak Japanese?” In the first class period (and from time to time afterwards) I talk to the students about how it is not possible to think and communicate well in English if they are using Japanese. In addition, I stress how using Japanese is selfish because it is a distraction to others and prevents them from thinking in English. As I monitor the students as they communicate, I try to keep my reprimands light-hearted. I might say something like “Some people here are speaking Swahili when they`re supposed to be speaking English!” or “Your Japaneseis very good–like a native speaker–but…” A very effective way to deal with studentpair chatting in Japanese is to stand behind one of the partners and not say anything while waiting. Sooner or later (usually sooner) these students and others get the message. I also remind the students regularly of the purpose of the activity and the fact that it is test practice.

Communication circles/lines, therefore, are not just a “teacher down time.” The teacher is kept busy as a cunsultant, monitor, diagnostician, information source/translator, and even participant.

Are conversation circles/lines worth it?–editor

You be the judge!

Here`s another example of this type of activity: The Dumbo Feather and Communication Circles.

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ESL Japan 2

Teaching English to Adults

Creating Confident Creative Conversationalist with Communcation Circles: Part 2

Teaching English to Adults

“The best way to study for a communication test is to communicate!”

by Thomas C. Anderson

More on Communication Circles

(Pictured: The Mickey Mouse Garden at the “Anne” English School in Kanagawa (Kevin`s English School))

Taking all of this into consideration, let us now look at Communcation Circles/Lines, an activity which has become the mainstay of my Oral English curriculum. The activity, which is very easily modified, can be done both inside and outside the classroom with a minimum of preparation. It is success-oriented and very motivating. A spillover effect occurs when this activity is put into practice. The enthusiasm that is generated continues into other more mundane classroom tasks and activities. For the most part, the activity is student-centered.

Teaching English to Adults — What are Communication Circles?

Communication circles are NOT “free conversation” (which to my mind, isperhaps a nice way to describe classroom anarchy). The activity involves what is mostly true unscripted one-to-one English communication. It provides the teacher with a buffer zone in which they don`t necessarily have to be “on” and it can easily be used as a diagnostic tool to find student problem areas. Perhaps the most important of all, doing this activity is a very good way to settle down and focus students.

When doing this activity for the first time, students are divided into two groups and stand either in two circles with each student in the outside circle facing a student in the inner circle or in two lines of students facing each other (depending on the size and shape of the classroom). An odd number of students can make a group of three or the teacher can participate as a speaking partner.

For the first quarter or half of the term, students begin their communication with a set “introduction pattern” as follows:

S1: Good morning./Hi. (depending on the time of day)

S2: Good morning./Hi.

S1: (Pointing to self) My name`s ============ (says name clearly). And you are? (points at partner)

S2: ============= ==================== (full name)

S1: Nice to meet you.

S2: Nice to meet you, too. Ss 1 and 2 shake hands)

As I lead students through the routine, I point out that importance of eye contact, body language, gestures, rising intonation, “hinting or signal” language,and even the firmness of the male-male North American handshake! After being walked through the routine once, I have students repeat it and then give them a subject such as “HOMETOWN” to talk about.

The first time students are given a topic in this way, there are usually a few moments of stunned silence (depending on the student level) and then a few brave souls say something to their partner. I cut the students off after a short time-perhaps twenty or thirty seconds and have them say thank you to their partner. One of the groups moves one person to the left or right and the process is repeated. At first I only use two topics twice so that students talk to four different people. Over the course of the term, conversation length and the number of partners and topics is increase (normally I end up having students talk to nine different partners about three different topics).

Teaching English to Adults: Debriefing

After their first experience of doing this communication, I have the students sit down and I do a debriefing session. In it, I emphasize the importance of what they have just done (you said something to your partner who listened carefully and replied–communication in English, in other words). Students are often surprised when they realize that they really did communicate with their partners in English.

Before doing Communcation Circles the second time, students are given a handout (see Appendix) containing eight “communication elements.” I go over one point per class (and review previous points covered) before students move into their circles or lines.I emphasize the fact that these are items which I will be watching for and considering when observing and grading their speaking test.

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